programme

Entrepreneurship and Development

Home/ Entrepreneurship and Development
Course TypeCourse CodeNo. Of Credits
Foundation CoreSDS2DS2074

Course Coordinator and Team: Anirban Sengupta

Email of course coordinator: anirban@aud.ac.in

Pre-requisites: None

Aim: Over the years, entrepreneurship has evolved as a significant framework for understanding the process of business and its development. With enhancement in the scope of business as a form of economic action, it has become more and more important to understand business in order to make sense of the way development is shaped. Here it is important to note that while business is largely about market and that is conceptually separated from state and community, all of them tend to come together under the broad framework of entrepreneurship. The historic identification of certain communities as business communities and shared development experience of these communities around their business involvement indicates the old connection between community and business. In modern times, different historically marginalized groups like Dalits in caste-segregated societies, Blacks in White-dominant areas are also attempting to emulate this path by setting up their own community-based business associations and engaging with entrepreneurship as a form of political action. These developments have also brought into light how identities based on caste, race, ethnicity, and gender shapes the entrepreneurial experience. It is also interesting to observe that modern state is exploring different mechanism of using entrepreneurship as a tool to shape development experience of individuals and regions. This course attempts to examine the nature of relationship between entrepreneurship and development by engaging with the intersections among collectives, business, and state. The course is intended for students who want to understand the connection between business and development in the context of modern state, community relations, and market.

Course Outcomes:

It is expected to facilitate development of

1. Knowledge about entrepreneurship in the context of forces emerging out state, community relations, and market 

2. Conceptual and historical understanding about the connection between business and development

3. Insights to look at development of entrepreneurship also as a political and cultural action 

Brief description of modules/ Main modules:

  1. Development of entrepreneurship: Protestant ethics, innovation, and achievement motivation 
  2. Community, family, networks, and Business
  3. Colonialism and ‘native’ entrepreneurship
  4. Entrepreneurship development and self-employment
  5. Enterprise clustering and cluster development
  6. Self-help group, microfinance, and entrepreneurship
  7. Entrepreneurship among subaltern and empowerment questions
  8. Gender and entrepreneurship

Assessment Details with weights:

SnoAssessmentDate/period in which Assessment will take placeWeightage
1Assessment 1Second week of September30%
2Assessment 2Second week of October35%
3Assessment 3Second week of November35%

 

Reading List:

  • Ahl, H., & Marlow, S. (2012). Exploring the dynamics of gender, feminism and entrepreneurship: Advancing debate to escape a dead end? Organization, 19(5), 543–562.
  • Bagchi, Amiya Kumar. (1992). European and Indian entrepreneurship in India 1900-30. In Entrepreneurship and industry in India, 1800-1947 (pp. 157-196) Edited by Rajat Kanta Ray. Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  • Bayly, C.A. (2011). The family firm: A microcosm. In The Oxford India anthology of business history (pp. 169-183) Edited by Medha M. Kudaisya. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  • Birley, S. (1988). Female entrepreneurs: Are they really different? Cranfield School of Management Working Paper 5/87. Cranfield, UK: Cranfield Institute of Technology.
  • Burt, Ronald S. (2000). The network entrepreneur. In Entrepreneurship: The social science view (pp. 281-307) Edited by Richard Swedberg. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  • Chari, Sharad. (2004). Fraternal capital: Peasant-workers, self-made men, and globalization in provincial India (Chapter 5: Can the subaltern accumulate capital? pp. 182-239). Stanford: Stanford University Press.
  • Das, Keshab. (2005). Indian industrial clusters (Chapter 1: Industrial clustering in India: Local dynamics and the global debate, pp. 1-20). Adlershot, UK: Ashgate Publishing Limited.
  • Deshpande, Ashwini and Sharma, Smriti. (2013). Entrepreneurship or survival? Caste and gender of small business in India. Economic and Political Weekly, XLVIII(28), 38-49.
  • Dy, A.M., Marlow, S., and Martin, L. (2017). A web of opportunity or the same old story? Women digital entrepreneurs and intersectionality theory. Human Relations, 70(3), 286–311.
  • Goswami, Omkar. (1992). Sahibs, babus, and banias: Changes in industrial control in Eastern India, 1918-50. In Entrepreneurship and industry in India, 1800-1947 (pp. 228-259) Edited by Rajat Kanta Ray. Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  • Granovetter, Mark. (2000). The economic Sociology of firms and entrepreneurs. In Entrepreneurship: The social science view (pp. 244-275) Edited by Richard Swedberg. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  • Harvey, Adia M. (2005). Becoming entrepreneurs: Intersections of race, class, and gender at Black beauty salon. Gender and Society, 19(6), 789-808.
  • Hulme, David and Maitrot, Mathilde. (2014). Has microfinance lost its moral compass? Economic and Political Weekly, XLIX(48), 77-85.
  • Jodhka, S. (2010). Dalits in business: Self-employed scheduled castes in north-west India, Economic and Political Weekly, 45(11), 41-48.
  • Kabeer, Naila. (2005). Is microfinance a 'magic bullet' for women's empowerment? Analysis of findings from south Asia. Economic and Political Weekly, 40(44/45), 4709-4718.
  • Knorringa, Peter. (1996). Economics of collaboration: Indian shoemakers between market and hierarchy (Chapter 6: Producer-trader relations in Agra’s footwear industry, pp. 105-152). New Delhi: Sage Publications.
  • McClelland, David C. (1961). The achieving society (Chapter 10: Accelerating economic growth, pp. 391-438). New Jersey, USA: D. Van Nostrand Company Inc.
  • Mies, Maria. (2012, Originally published in 1982). The lace makers of Narsapur: Indian housewives produce for the world market (Chapter 5: Structure of the industry, pp. 59-80).
  • Neetha, N. (2010). Self employment of women: Preference or compulsion? Social Change, 40 (2), 139–156.
  • Romijn, H.A. (1989). Entrepreneurship training for small business in developing countries: Some issues. Economic and Political Weekly, 24(8), M8-M14.
  • Roy, Tirthankar. (2010). Company of kinsmen: Enterprise and community in south Asian history 1700-1940 (Chapter 3: Merchants – Guild as corporation, pp. 89-129). New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  • Schmitz, Hubert and Musyck, Bernard. (2016). Industrial districts in Europe: Policy lessons for developing countries In Industrial districts in history and the developing world (pp. 117-151) Edited by Tomoko Hashino and Keijiro Otsuka. Singapore: Springer
  • Schumpeter, Joseph A. (2000). Entrepreneurship as innovation. In Entrepreneurship: The social science view (pp. 51-75) Edited by Richard Swedberg. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  • Tankha, Ajay. (2012). Banking on self-help groups: Twenty years on (Chapter 2: Origins and evolution of SHG-Bank linkage programme, pp. 9-33). New Delhi: Sage Publications.
  • Timberg, Thomas A. (2014). The Marwaris: From Jagat Seth to the Birlas (Chapter 3: The Marwaris, the bazaar economy, and the British raj, pp. 24-77). Gurgaon: Portfolio – Penguin Books India Pvt. Ltd.
  • Vijayabaskar, M. and Kalaiyarasan, A. (2014). Caste as social capital: The Tiruppur story. Economic and Political Weekly, XLIX(10), 34-38.
  • Weber, Max. (2007). The Protestant ethic and the spirit of capitalism. In Classical Sociological Theory (pp. 228-246) Edited by Craig Calhoun, Joseph Gerteis, James Moody, Steven Pfaff, and Indermohan Virk. Malden, USA: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
  • Yunus, Muhammad. (2004). Grameen bank, microcredit, and Millennium Development Goals. Economic and Political Weekly, 39(36), 4077-80.

ADDITIONAL REFERENCE:

  • Bagchi, Amiya Kumar. (1972). Private investment in India 1900-1939 (Chapter 6: The supply of capital and entrepreneurship, pp. 157-216). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Bayly, C.A. (2010, First published in 1983). Rulers, townsmen and bazaars: North Indian society in the age of British expansion 1770-1870 (Chapter 10: The merchant family, pp. 369-393). New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  • Bayly, C.A. (2010, First published in 1983). Rulers, townsmen and bazaars: North Indian society in the age of British expansion 1770-1870 (Chapter 11: The merchant family as a business enterprise, pp. 394-426). New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  • Bayly, C.A. (2011). Merchant communities: Identities and solidarities. In The Oxford India anthology of business history (pp. 99-121) Edited by Medha M. Kudaisya. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  • Beugelsdijk, Sjoerd and Roger Smeets. (2008). Entrepreneurial culture and economic growth: Revisiting McClelland's thesis. The American Journal of Economics and Sociology, 67 (5), 915-940.
  • Bhatt, Ela R. (2006). We are poor but so many: The story of self-employed women in India (Chapter 1: Being poor, a woman, and self-employed, pp. 23-46). New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Blaug, Mark. (2000). Entrepreneurship before and after Schumpeter. In Entrepreneurship: The social science view (pp. 76-88) Edited by Richard Swedberg. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  • Boeri, N. (2018). Challenging the gendered entrepreneurial subject: Gender, development, and the informal economy in India. Gender & Society. Retrieved from http://journals. sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/0891243217750119 on 28 February 2018.
  • Bruni, A., Gherardi, S., &Poggio, B. (2004). Gender and entrepreneurship: An Ethno-Graphic Approach. New York: Routledge.
  • Bushell, B. (2008). Women entrepreneurs in Nepal: What prevents them from leading the sector? Gender and Development, 16(3), 549-564.
  • Damodaran, H. (2008). India’s new capitalists: Caste, business, and industry in a modern nation. Ranikhet, India: Permanent Black.
  • Desai, Ashok V. (1992). The origins of Parsi enterprise. In Entrepreneurship and industry in India, 1800-1947 (pp. 99-108) Edited by Rajat Kanta Ray. Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  • Dijk, Meine Pieter van. (2005). Classifying small enterprise clusters: A conceptual enquiry in Ahmedabad. In Indian industrial clusters Edited by Keshab Das. Aldershot, UK: Ashgate Publishing Limited.
  • Essers, C. and Benschop, Y. (2009). Muslim businesswomen doing boundary work: The negotiation of Islam, gender and ethnicity within entrepreneurial contexts. Human Relations, 62(3), 403–423.
  • Galab, S. and Rao, N. Chandrasekhara. (2003). Women's self-help groups, poverty alleviation and empowerment. Economic and Political Weekly, 38(12/13), 1274-1283.
  • Gomes, Janina. (2001). SMEs and industrial clusters: Lessons for India from Italian experience. Economic and Political Weekly, 36(49), 4532-3.
  • Granovetter, Mark. (1992). Economic action and social structure: The problem of embeddedness. In The Sociology of economic life (pp. 53-81) Edited by Mark Granovetter and Richard Swedberg. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press.
  • Guru, Gopal, (2012). Rise of the 'dalit millionaire': A low intensity spectacle. Economic and Political Weekly, XLVII(50), 41-49.
  • Harvey, A.M. (2005). Becoming entrepreneurs: Intersections of race, class, and gender at the black beauty salon. Gender & Society, 19 (6), 789-808.
  • Haynes, Douglas E. (2012). Small town capitalism in western India: Artisans, merchants, and the making of the informal economy 1870-1960 (Chapter 2: Artisanal towns, pp. 56-92). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Hulme, David and Arun, Thankom. (2011). What’s wrong and right with microfinance. Economic and Political Weekly, XLVI(48), 23-26.
  • Kapur, D., Babu, D.S., Prasad, C. (2014). Defying the odds: The rise of Dalit entrepreneurs. New Delhi: Random House India.
  • Karim, Lamia. (2011). Microfinance and its discontents: Women in debt in Bangladesh (Introduction: Neo-liberalism, microfinance, and women’s empowerment, pp. xiii-xxxiii). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
  • Kling, Blair, B. (1992). The origin of managing agency system in India. In Entrepreneurship and industry in India, 1800-1947 (pp. 83-98) Edited by Rajat Kanta Ray. Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  • Knorringa, Peter. (2005). An Italian model and an Indian reality: Searching for a way out of deteriorating sweatshop condition. In Indian industrial clusters (pp. 21-36) Edited by Keshab Das. Adlershot, UK: Ashgate Publishing Limited.
  • Markovits, Claude. (2008). Merchants, traders, entrepreneurs: Indian business in the colonial era. Ranikhet: Permanent Black.
  • McClelland, David C. (1961). The achieving society (Chapter 2: The achievement motive: How is it measured and its economic effects, pp. 36-62). New Jersey, USA: D. Van Nostrand Company Inc.
  • Morrison, Ken. (2006). Marx, Durkheim, Weber: Formations of modern social thought. London: Sage Publications Ltd.
  • Müller, Walter and Arum, Richard. (2004). Self-employment dynamics in advanced economies. In The reemergence of self-employment: A comparative study of self-employment dynamics and social inequality (pp. 1-35) By Richard Arum and Walter Müller. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  • Nair, Tara S., Sathye, Milind, Perumal, Muni, Applegate, Craig, and Sathye, Suneeta. (2014). Indian microfinance and codes of conduct regulation: A critical examination. In Globalization and standards: Issues and challenges in Indian business (pp. 103-120) Edited by Keshab Das. New Delhi: Springer.
  • Oza, A.N. (1988). Integrated entrepreneurship development programmes: The Indian experience. Economic and Political Weekly, 23 (22), M73-M79.
  • Parthasarathy, Balaji. (2005). The political economy of the computer software industry in Bangalore, India. In ICTs and Indian economic development: Economy, work, regulation (pp. 199-230) Edited by Ashwani Saith and M. Vijayabaskar. New Delhi: Sage Publications.
  • Prakash, A. (2010). Dalit entrepreneurs in middle India In The comparative political economy of development: Africa and South Asia (pp. 291-316) Edited by Judith Heyer and Barbara Harriss-White. London: Routledge.
  • Ray, Rajat Kanta. (1992). Entrepreneurship and industry in India, 1800-1947 (Introduction, pp. 1-69) Edited by Rajat Kanta Ray. Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  • Saxenian, AnnaLee. (2000). The origins and dynamics of production networks in Silicon Valley. In Entrepreneurship: The social science view (pp. 308-331) Edited by Richard Swedberg. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  • Schumpeter, Joseph A. (1949). The theory of economic development: An inquiry into profits, capital, credit, interest, and the business cycle. Massachusetts, USA: Harvard University Press.
  • Silverman, R.M. (1999). Black business, group resources, and the economic detour: Contemporary black manufacturers in Chicago’s ethnic beauty aids industry. Journal of Black Studies, 30(2), 232-258.
  • Sriram, M.S. (2005). Microfinance and the state: Exploring areas and structures of collaboration. Economic and Political Weekly, 40(17), 1699, 1701-1704.
  • Sriram, M.S. (2010). Microfinance: A fairy tale turns into a nightmare. Economic and Political Weekly, XLV(43), 10-13.
  • Tripathi, Dwijendra. (2004). The Oxford history of Indian business (Chapter 4: The age of the agency houses, pp. 44-60). New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  • Tripathi, Dwijendra. (2004). The Oxford history of Indian business (Chapter 5: Experiments in Indo-British partnership, pp. 61-72). New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  • Valdez, Z. (2011). The new entrepreneurs: How race, class, and gender shape American enterprise (Chapter 2: The embedded market: Race, class, and gender in American enterprise, pp. 22-41). Stanford: Stanford University Press.